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to what the president said today and what speaker john boehner said last week. listen to this. >> you've said that the wealthiest must pay more. would closing loopholes instead of raising rates for them sty y satisfy you? >> i think there are loopholes that should be closed and we should look at how we can make the process of deductions, the filing process easier, simpler, but when it comes to the top 2%, what i'm not going to do is to extend further a tax cut for folks who don't need it. >> raising tax rates is unacceptable and frankly, it couldn't even pass the house. >> well, it feels like a dÉjÀ vu all over again. somebody is going to have to blink or we go over the fiscal cliff. my next guest knows all about fiscal cliff uncertainty and its effect on the individual investor. walter bettinger is ceo of charles schwab. the market certainly feels pessimistic. we are looking at another 200-point decline today. the market is down 5% since the president was re-elected. what are you hearing from clients? >> clients are really concerned. there is pessimism among investors. there's grea
the campaign. you have to listen closely to the words used by the principle negotiators. first was john boehner today, who with drew a line not against additional tax revenue but only against the idea of raising top rates. >> listen, the problem with raising tax rates on the wealthiest americans is that more than half of them are small business owners. we know 700 no,000 jobs would b destroyed. we also know it would slow down our economy. >> and by the same token, president obama came out in the east room, and the line he drew was not in favor of higher -- insisting on higher tax rates, it's that we need more tax revenue from people at the top. >> i'm not whetted to every detail of my plan. i'm open to compromise. i'm open to new ideas. i'm committed to solving our fiscal challenges. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. >> so the keyword for the president is balanced. but more than one way to get there. maria, just before i came on air, got a statement from the bipartisan policy center in washington, which has been urging the two sides to come together on a simpson-bowles ty
mcconnell, house speaker john boehner and nancy pelosi. so, will we get a deal? one man getting a lot of attention is erskine bowles. did you ever think your name would be part of pop culture? you are the bowles in simpson bowles. >> better be simpson bowles than bowles simpson since everybody knows him by his initials here in washington. >> so, when you talk about things, sacred cows, untouchables, whatever the word might be, in your proposal, the one paul ryan decided not to back, the one barack obama decided not to back, you had an increase in the federal gasoline tax. caps on mortgage interest. charitable donations and retirement contributions. these were all top choices. you also increased the eligibility age for medicare and social security. reduced benefits for wealthier seniors. some of those things average democrats and republicans say they agree on, other, they loathe them. is there anything that should be untouchable? >> the problems are real, no easy way out. we've got to come up with at least $4 trillion of deficit reduction and that's not the maximum amount we need to do
to every debail of his plan. house speaker, john boehner, wants to keep all the bush tax cuts in place. he's starting to talk about closing up tax loopholes. conservative pundit and weekly standard editor bill kristol said it's time for republicans to come so some sort of compromise. >> conservative movement has to pull back, let people float new ideas, let's have a serious debate. don't scream and yell when one person says it won't kill the country if we raise taxes a little bit on millionaires. it really won't, i don't think. i don't understand why republicans don't take obama's offer? >> cnn's senior congressional correspondent dana bash is live for us in washington, d.c. what do you make of his comments? >> soledad, look, bill kristol is not an elected official. he doesn't get a vote. but he is a very influential gop voice here in washington. and around the country. and for him to tell republicans it wouldn't kill to them to agree to tax increases for millionaires. it's a big deal. and we heard some similar talk from republicans who do have a vote like senator bob corker. listen to thi
reported on this program last week, house sneaker john boehner used a post election conference call with rank and file republicans to plead for patience and running room with the president and did just win re-election, mandate or not. wolf? >> thanks very much. let's hope they work out a deal. the stakes enormous. >> there's quite a lot of nice talk and we're oh so far from cles to a deal quiet and continuing to follow it. >>> still ahead, neighbors heard a blast and thought it might be an earthquake. we'll have the latest on what caused a deadly explosion that damaged dozens of homes. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. [ "the odd couple" theme playing ] humans. even when we cross our "t"s and dot our "i"s, we still run
connell and john boehner. can you help explain that? >> mitch mcconnell who runs the senate republican caucus, he's definitely playing the role of the bad cop in that he does not want to compromise at all on tax cuts, has taken a much more hard-line approach, has the bulk of his time talking to "the wall street journal" editorial page, basically speaking to the base. where you have speaker boehner talking in much more conciliatory tones and talking about getting a deal. i think that's going to be the dynamic. mitch mcconnell is up for re-election in 2014. in a very conservative state where it's not inconceivable the tea party would run somebody against him if he does not take a hard-line approach. people need to remember that as these negotiations unfold. for boehner, he wants a deal. i do want to comment a second on the interview you had with paul ryan. ryan might not think that there is a mandate, but the president does, congressional democrats do, and the public does, if you look at polling. and there's zero chance that the president is going to compromise on this, which is why i think there's
to be for raising taxes. but let's be clear. when john boehner says, i'm open to raising revenues, he had on the table a proposal to raise taxes. that's what it means when you're raising revenues. they can spin it any way they want, it's raising taxes by $800 billion. so the republican party, in a growing number of folks in the republican party, are on record for raising taxes. and they know the number's going to have to be above 800. that's the floor from last year. i think the actual number will be 1.2 which will be the middle ground between 800 and $1.6 trillion. you don't get to $1.2 trillion without either raising tax rates or changing how we tax investment, which is the reason that a lot of rich people end up paying a very low tax rate. people like mitt romney can pay an effective tax rate of 10% to 15% because so much of their income comes from long-term investment holdings. something has to give. you have to change those things if you want to raise that type of revenue. >> we've talked a lot about the tax side of this, but there's spending cuts that need to be dealt with. no one w
republicans. listen who what house speaker john boehner said about that throwing cold water on it. >> at this point i think that the standing committees of the house whether they be the oversight committee or the intelligence committee are working diligently on these issues, and at this point i think that's appropriate. >> now, what john mccain and his colleagues are arguing is that there's too much stove piping going on. there are too many committees, and twoul today is a good example. there are hearings going on all over capitol hill and then probably will continue to be. they think it all should be streamlined into one committee, but, suzanne, using the term watergate, using the term coverup, saying what did he know, when did he know it, talking about the president, not exactly a way to get bipartisan support for something that, you know, democrats clearly don't want. it is absolutely -- you mentioned at the beginning, very, very tense, particularly between these two old rivals, john mccain and president obama. >> not the way to bite -- get the bipartisanship going. okay, dana.
. this was the secret negotiation between barack obama and john boehner last year. we don't know all of the pieces that were in it. they offered 8$800 billion in revenue and then on the spending cut side they offered $450 billion in cuts to medicare and medication and changes to the way social security benefits are calculated. a lot of things on the table here. big things both tax increases and spending decreases. it's going to take some combination of those to get to a deal here and it's sort of where they go on this menu of options that's going to lead to whether or not they have votes to do it on capitol hill. >> there's a detail there. cut through it for me if you will. a lot of people around seem to suggest that they're going to get this thing tied up really quite quickly. my concern is that obama is beginning to grandstand. if you look at who he's meeting with, it looks like he might be preparing for a huge fight for his legacy, which actually might push us further back than a lot of people have bargained for. >> what you'll see with obama meeting with progressive groups and business leaders
and he's trying to figure out how to get republicans to build on the conciliatory signals that john boehner's been sending. >> we talked earlier this morning about what the "wall street journal" has at the top and the story that a lot of people have been talking about. laying out $1.6 trillion as the baseline for what he'd like to see. double where the talks left off back in the summer of 2011. is this just an opening bid and we expect it will be somewhere in the middle of those two numbers? >> that's what i expect. i don't think you start out by laying out your bottom line. and remember, that's a bottom line that he laid out publicly in september of 2011 after the grand bargain talks were concluded unsuccessfully. so this is -- this is basically no change in his position. and why would he change having just won an election? but i think you're going to see some back and forth. and if question is how much revenue can you get from closing deductions and loopholes and if so, what kind? and do rates need to rise in order to get the revenue you need to make a deal? and i think what he wa
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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